About the Yarn

Woolpaca:

  • 50% superfine alpaca, 50% wool
  • Guage: 4 stitches to 1″ on US 8
  • Approx. 218 yd/ 200m
  • 100g/ 3.4 oz
  • Comes in solid, semi-solid, multi-colored, and gradient sets

Meritime:

  • 50% merino wool, 50% seacell
  • Guage: 4 stitches to 1″ on US 8
  • Approx. 218 yd/ 200m
  • 100g/ 3.4 oz
  • Comes in solid, and gradient sets
  • Also sold in semi-solid and multi-colored in 2 kits: “3 Part Invention” and “Sassy Sampler Scarf”

The first yarn I picked out to dye with 4 years ago (when I worked for Osborn Fiber Studio) was the Woolpaca.  I continue to  enjoy this yarn.  It is soft and sturdy, and takes the natural dye very well.  It is cheaper than the Meritime because the blanks are cheaper for me to buy.  The Meritime is also more expensive because it often takes more dye material to get the same, intense colors. I began using the Meritime yarn a year later because I wanted to have two bases. It is extremely soft and very wearable next to the skin. It is also has a beautiful sheen similar to yarns with silk in them.

When I began ColorStorms this year, I changed the pricing system. I decided that I wanted the prices to better reflect how much or how little work went into each color. For example, pokeberries are difficult to work with because I have to pick them by hand and it’s a very time-consuming process. So is working with apple bark and black beans and madder root. Thus they are more expensive yarns. On the other hand, black walnuts are much easier. I simply collect a bucket full from my front yarn, simmer them on the stove, and dye the yarn. The brown color does not even need a mordant! So they are the cheapest color. In the middle are the purples and pinks. I have to purchase those natural dyes because they come from logwood trees and cochineal bugs, neither of which I have. Even though I have to purchase the material, the dye process is fairly simple and quick.

I hope this helps you to understand my pricing system, along with some details about each yarn base.